• Kona Coffee & Tea (map)
  • 74-5588 Palani Road
  • Kailua-Kona, Hawaii 96740
  • U.S.A.

As part of our Summer Series of events at our café, TALKSTORY TUESDAYS are conversations where leaders in art, culture, and industry share their perspectives about the unique culture of Hawai`i Island. "Talk story" is a term used to describe the common laid-back conversation that happens between people in the islands. These events are free and open to the public. 

HEADER PHOTO: Charles Christianson

Join us on Tuesday, July 17th, from 5-6:30pm for a talk story with Cultural Practitioner Ku`ulei Keakealani and Hoa `Aina Sandy "Lehua" Kamaka, both from Hui Aloha Kiholo, and Marine Coordinator Rebecca Most of The Nature Conservancy.   Hear about how science, culture and community stewardship drives their work at Kīholo. 

 

KIHOLO 

View of Kiholo Bay facing Hualalai  PHOTO: Charles Christianson

Kīholo Bay is located in north of Kailua-Kona, on one of the last stretches of undeveloped coastline. Kīholo Bay is nested within the greater Kīholo State Park Reserve. The area contains an extensive coastal wildland environment, historic home sites, swimming areas, anchialine ponds, and historic coastal trails with associated archaeological features. These elements are noteworthy for their uniqueness, beauty, and value to both Hawaii residents and island visitors. Kīholo Bay connects ecologically, historically, and culturally to the mauka (upland) areas of Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a.

 

HUI ALOHA KIHOLO

 Volunteers repairing `Auwai   PHOTO: Jennifer Mitchell

Volunteers repairing `Auwai   PHOTO: Jennifer Mitchell

Hui Aloha Kīholo is a nonprofit organization that has a curatorship agreement with the State of Hawaii, Department of Land and Natural Resources, to manage camping and caretake the cultural and natural resources of the reserve. 

In 2007, Hui Aloha Kīholo was created as a response to the growing number of issues and concerns occurring in and around Kīholo Bay. These include the many recent changes along the greater West Hawai`i coastline, the designation of Kīholo Bay as a State Park Reserve, and an expressed desire among the community to work together to care for Kīholo. The mission of this organization is to protect, perpetuate, and enhance the cultural and natural landscape of the Kīholo Bay area through collaborative management and active community stewardship.

 Volunteers in the native plant enclosure on a workday.

Volunteers in the native plant enclosure on a workday.

Together with their partners, including The Nature Conservancy, Hui Aloha Kiholo works towards an organized and collaborative effort to take care of a place that is significant to Hawaiian history and culture, as well as to the people who are currently connected to Kīholo through lineage, family history, residence, and recreation. 

The public is invited to a Community Workday at Kaloko O Kiholo (fishpond) on Saturday, July 21, from 9am-1pm, including a potluck lunch. The work involves clearing invasive vegetation and debris from the fishpond edges and inside, also maintaining the anchialine pool native plants by pulling weeds and hauling. Visit huialohakiholo.org for more information or RSVP to barbara.seidel@tnc.org for directions.  

 

GUESTS

 Ku`ulei Keakealani

Ku`ulei Keakealani

KU`ULEI KEAKEALANI

Educator, cultural practitioner, poet, storyteller, activist, and our Education and Cultural Director at Hui Aloha Kīholo, Ku`ulei wears many hats, but wears them all with a strong sense of the history of her ancestors and the responsibility we have to perpetuate Hawaiian culture for future generations. Ku`ulei leads the education of over 1,000 youth, through school visits to Kiholo each year. She is also a lineal descendant of the ahupua‘a system of Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a.  

 SANDY "LEHUA" KAMAKA

SANDY "LEHUA" KAMAKA


SANDY "LEHUA" KAMAKA

Sandy works on the ground at Kīholo as a part of the Hoa ʻĀina team.  Hoa ʻĀina, or “friends of the land” monitor and protect natural and cultural resources, engage with and educate visitors, and manage camping.  By creating a community of stewards, with visitors, kamaina, partners, and advocates, the goal is to have Kīholo thrive culturally and environmentally. 

 

 REBECCA MOST

REBECCA MOST

REBECCA MOST

Rebecca Most is the Marine Coordinator for The Nature Conservancy on Hawaii Island. She is also a boat captain, scientific diver, and amazing organizer of many volunteers at Kaloko O Kiholo, the revitalized fishpond at Kiholo. Upon his death in 1989, legendary hair stylist and hair-care product icon Paul Mitchell left several valuable Hawaiian properties in trust to his son, Angus Mitchell. Among them was an idyllic coastal parcel at Kīholo Bay. In 2011, the younger Mitchell donated the property to The Nature Conservancy and they have ben restoring it with the community's help ever since.